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obama give the order to have these people killed? is that what you're saying? caller: ronald reagan was not hesitating that's for sure. hal: ronald reagan would have killed the american ambassador in benghazi? caller: i heard speeches of ronald reagan and they sound completely different as they do to obama. hal: you mean the speeches around iron-contra, for example. caller: and nobody's perfect. hal: nobody's perfect. >> how can you speculate how president reagan would react in today's environment? i think milltail things have changed. hal: if policies any indication, he'd be a democratic, because he'd have to change parties after he was primaried as a republican. jacki: because he was too moderate. the nature of warfare that ha changed, too. hal: george is talking out of his posterior. you can tell with the conversion from benghazi to reagan. jacki: a cooling gel might be good for that. hal: i would say to george before he calls back in and tries on another show or either on this one to push that as a paired example of presidential egregious behavior to read up on history. there ar
at these three world leaders too. ronald reagan never made sure his time matched -- >> okay. this is just ridiculous. >> there you go. >> stungningly profind. >> let's go to politico, please. with us now -- >> also makes him superior to ronald reagan, right? >> whatever. >> the messiah has returned to israel. look at that. >> are you kidding me? >>> with us now is chief white house correspondent for politico, mike allen, here with the morning playbook. >> this is a good one. >> watch the live pictures while we talk to mike. i think we can walk and chew gum at the same time according to joe. >> i doubt it. >> mike, new report from politico suggest a number of big name democrats are not thrilled with the idea of ashley judd challengi challenging senate minority leader in conduct. some party leaders including former president bill clinton is trying to court another candidate. the kentucky secretary of state. the former president encouraged her to run assuring his and hillary clinton's support should she try to unseat mcconnell. judd under fire for a speech she delivered in 2010 she compared
is conservative enough. there was a -- listen, when ronald reagan was president, the people who represented what they thought was the -- you know, the real republican wing of the republican party, often complained about him, that he wasn't conservative enough to suit them either. sarah palin, despite having bailed out of public office, still has a following in the republican party, and you know, you criticize her, you hear about it. so does karl rove, he has influence with a lot of people who are prepared to put money behind his strategic thinking and the mistake that was made here that got rove into this trouble in my judgment is that when he and his group decided they were going to try to have influence in these primaries they announced that the people who felt that rove represented the failures of the bush years and so on, that was a red flag and you are seeing the reaction to it. >> bill: okay. but having talked to karl rove many, many times on this program, i can tell you that he is a guy who doesn't want a conservative litmus test to limit some candidates who may be more moderate and appea
's neoconservatism were alive and well in ronald reagan in george w. bush who promoted a conservatism marked by compassion and common sense for the every man. today's conservatism is perceived as matter high minded nor of the people. existing instead in some nether reger
in your book, that in the ronald reagan, 1984 debate. tell us what happened. >> well, they had, reagan had a bad first debate and people were saying that he was confused and say that he was too old. and roger was brought in as a kind of a debate counselor for reagan and he told reagan, look, you're the president. you've got -- obviously you don't need to impress people with facts and figures, you need to be yourself. and i found out later, as i worked on this book for fox and his advice to everybody when they go on the air is to be themselves. and reagan took the advice and did very well in the second debate. >> greta: and of course, the famous line out of that second debate about mondale's age, at least, that's roger's line? >> i don't think it's roger's line, but everybody around reagan was afraid to mention to him that people thought he was too old and roger, who is not afraid of much told reagan directly, you have to come up with something that will address the concern about your age. and reagan came up with that, with that line. >> greta: which was that he wasn't going to make age an
for ronald reagan and for george h.w. bush. so he's really -- he started out as a political consultant. he's certainly a republican. he's certainly a conservative. that's reflected in fox news. i did a quiz with him that a professor at ucla had cooked up to measure conservativism versus liberalism. and he took it and so did i, by the way. and it turns out that he is more conservative than the network. and he agreed that that's probably true. >> so he's obviously very conservative in that position that he has, it filters down, i assume, on the network. i want to play a clip. this is sarah palin. she used to be a fox news contributor until the last election. this is what she said at the conservative political action conference that took place in washington this past weekend. >> if these experts who keep losing elections, yet keep getting rehired, raking in millions, if they feel that strongly about who gets to run in the party, then show should buck up or stay in the truck. buck up and run. the architect can head on back to -- [ cheers ] -- they can head on back to the great lone star state
, appointed by ronald reagan in 1987, but he's the author of the court's two most important gay rights decision. lawrence v. texas, which said that states could no longer ban consensual sodomy among consenting adults and the romer case from colorado. so he is certainly the most likely of the five republicans on the court to join the four democrats, at least on the defense of marriage act case, if not also on the proposition 8 case. there are two same-sex marriage cases to be argued next week. >> so, jimmy, if things don't go your way, if the justices like, you know, i'll just shorthand it, rule against same-sex marriage, rule out its constitutionality, what will you do? >> well, this issue is being talked about in every state. and the tenth amendment leaves marriage and family law to the states. and i think that there will be a state-by-state recognition that gay people should have the opportunity and the ability to get married and that will take just a longer conversation that we're having as a nation. and that's what we'll do. we'll continue to take it state by state and show that ma
the definition. but what i'd say -- i'd say what we have now is de facto amnesty. jon: yeah, the fact is ronald reagan signed the legislation in the mid '80s that was going to fix the immigration problem once and for all, and here we are 20 years lateerer, more than that, with, you know, 11 and 12 million illegal immigrants in this country. >> well, those events of the '80s still haunt the immigration debate today. an amnesty was given out, the border was not secured, and in the 2000s, especially under the administration of george push, there was a huge increase in the number of illegal immigrants. the one thing republicans do agree on is they need to do something about this. even the ones who think border security only is the way to go, they all feel they have to do something about it. the problem just cannot continue to exist as it has for the last decade. jon: well, and the speeches, maybe the presidential campaign speeches continue. we'll see how long it takes to get some legislative language out there. byron york, thank you. >> thank you, jon. jenna: well, a major american city dealing wit
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8

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